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A personal journey along the Camino de Santiago

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26th of May – Cruz de Ferro and Beyond | Foncebadón to Molinaseca

26th of May – Cruz de Ferro and Beyond | Foncebadón to Molinaseca

Rob The Traveller

The Cruz de Ferro

 

A very Special Place for Camino Pilgrims

 

I wanted to make sure that I got to the Cross before big crowds of pilgrims got there.

So as breakfast started at 6:30 at the hostel, I was on my way by 6:50.

 

Walking out of Foncebadon

 

The walk up to the cross from Foncebadon was only about two and a half kilometers and it was a glorious walk in the early morning, with the crisp air, and great views looking back across the way we had come.

When I got to the cross, I was not disappointed.

There were only a few people there and it wasn’t too noisy. And so I laid my stone and some stones for others and said a few words at the cross (just like in the movie)

 

I really like the traditional Camino Pilgrims Prayer…

 

‘Lord, may this stone, a symbol of my efforts on the pilgrimage that i lay at the foot of the cross, weigh the balance in favour of my good deeds some day when the deeds of my life are judged. let it be so.’

 

I then hung around taking photographs and videos.  I could have stayed there for hours….

It was certainly an emotional part of the Camino.

 

Cruz de Ferro

 

Rob O'Byrne at the Cruz de Ferro

 

The walk down from the cross was extremely pleasant. The weather was great, and the views fantastic.

Small villages on the way down Acebo and Riego de Ambros were probably some of the nicest villages I’ve come across so far.

Acebo, being the first village I came to, I stopped for refreshment, a bocadillo and a cold drink before continuing.

 

Acebo, Spain

 

I knew that the descent from Acebo and down through Riego de Ambros was going to be quite steep but I was feeling quite capable of doing that.

I should have known better…..

From Acebo down to Riego de Ambros wasn’t too bad, but after that it became extremely rocky and difficult underfoot.

 

Walking to Molinaseca

 

That was probably the hardest part of my Camino so far in terms of the physical walking.

By the time I arrived at Molinaseca, I really felt like I couldn’t walk much further. Unfortunately, the descent over a very rough terrain was creating problems with my shins again.

So once I settled into my hostel in Molinaseca, it was trip round to the pharmacy to see what they could do. They’ve loaded me up with a range of compression socks and ointments.

I’ll need to rest a bit the following day before continuing just to make sure that I don’t cause any further damage to my shins, as if this gets worse, it can be a showstopper.

Unfortunately rest is really the only thing to do when you get shin splints.

But the good news is, the hostel that I was booked into is really nice and as I sit outside, having some refreshments, a few familiar faces are coming into town so at least that will make dinner a pleasant experience.

 

The Way Hostel Molinaseca, Spain

Molinaseca, Spain

 

Sorry there are so many videos today, but there was a lot, a lot, to see.

In the videos below, you’ll see sections of the complete stage along with a fair bit around the Cruz de Ferro and probably the most beautiful town I’ve met on the Camino so far, Molinaseca.

I also take a few minutes out to pause and reflect on the journey so far.  Whilst a few ‘Camino Amigos’ drop in….

 

Leaving Foncebadón

 

To the top

 

Cruz de Ferro

 

Peaceful

 

Cows

 

More cows

 

Looking Back

 

What’s this?

 

Views

 

Reflections on my Camino so far (and meeting lots of people!)

 

Track Maintenance

 

Fixing legs

 

Lavender

 

Acebo

 

Listen

 

Riego de Ambros

 

Rough final section is tough going

 

The end is in sight

 

Finally there and very sore

 

Molinaseca

    8 Comments

  1. I hope your legs are holding out Rob, your journey is truly enthralling. I am praying for you good health.

    • Hi Wrenchy. Hope you are well mate.

      I thought I would try out all that the Camino has to offer, so sampling a bigger portion of shin splints at the moment LOL.

      The descent from Cruz De Ferro was probably my toughest day yet….

      But I’m laid up icing my shins in a lovely room with views across Molinaseca and the sound of the river through the open windows.

      Life is good…. until the next Camino ‘curved ball’ arrives!

  2. Please note. NO. I have not put on weight. I have lost weight. I just forgot to take out my security pouch for the Cruz De ferro photo ! That’s my excuse anyway. … 🙂

  3. Hi Rob,

    I walked St. Jean de Port to Pamplona in April 2014 and the weather wasn’t good but the experience was spectacular. I just returned from 11 days on el Camino Norte, San Sebastian to Santander, again spectacular.

    I have been following your Camino for the last week and tell you this…..you have the support of every man, woman, and child who has ever walked any of these routes. You are in our thoughts, our prayers, our spirits with each step you take. Whether you do a few days like I have done, or attempt the entire distance, we are with you. We are pilgrims, one step at a time.

    Buen Camino Rob! Walk on!

    Blake
    California, USA

    • Thanks Blake.

      It really is spectacular isn’t it?

      Taking a ‘physio’ break at the moment before tackling the final stages.

      I admire anyone who can do this without having to take ‘timeout’ for injury! And to those in their 70s and 80s who just keep moving along!

  4. Hi Rob,
    I’m totally loving following your progress along the Camino Frances via your blog here.
    I’ve seen many of your posts on the Camino Forum leading up to this Pilgrimage – and there you are! What a great job you’re doing!
    Your daily posts are wonderful. Interesting, informative, humorous and also helping in no small way in settling a few of my nerves for me upcoming Pilgrimage along the same route commencing June 16.
    For today’s blog post, I especially liked the ‘Lavender’ video. Not just for the beautiful lavender, but also for showing the descent into Molinaseca. I wasn’t planning on using walking poles for my Camino (was planning on using a traditional looking Pilgrim’s staff), but seeing as how I’m already nursing twin knee injuries, I think the poles are going to be a necessity 🙂

    • Poles will be essential for you.

      I would also get a professional medical opinion on how best to ‘manage’ your knees.

      For those with an existing foot/leg ‘condition’ this is not a ‘walk in the park’…..

  5. oh what an earthly color greenery, flowery, cowery… mountainery… vibrantly!

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